Teaching Cleveland News Network

Ironworkers placing the last steel beam in the Sohio building (200 Public Square), which was completed in 1985 #ThisWasCLE

Teaching Cleveland News Network
News From Around Ohio and the U.S. 
of Interest to Northeast Ohio
   

FEATURES/OPINION/VIDEO 

Take a tour of Cuyahoga County’s 109 historical markers (3/24/2017) Cleveland.com

The Impact of Ohio Budget Cuts on NE Ohio Communities, including Preview, Summary and Video 3/21/2017

A brief history of fights, feuds and a coup at Cleveland City Hall (3/16/2017) Cleveland.com

Cleveland was the First City of Light. A call for a “Festival of Lights” in Cleveland by Chris Ronayne (3/15/2017) Cleveland Magazine

The Great Lakes are sicker than we think (3/9/2017) Belt

Reissuing a special 1961 magazine celebrating Cleveland’s first 165 years (3/7/2017) Cleveland.com

Transit alone cannot solve the systemic problems behind job inaccessibility (3/7/2017) a two part essay by Tim Kovach  Part 2 is here

Report Shows Voter Fraud is Rare in Ohio: editorial (3/5/2017) Columbus Dispatch

Cleveland’s dividing lines over race issues come to light under Trump (3/3/2017) The Guardian

Women’s History Month: Cleveland suffragettes, protests and parades since 1869 (3/2/2017) Cleveland.com

Today, March 1, is the anniversary of Ohio Statehood (Video) History.com

NEWS 

Pension cuts looming for Ohio teachers and retirees (3/28/2017) Dayton Daily News

Cleveland City Council OKs spending plan that bolsters safety forces, enhances city services (3/28/2017) Cleveland.com

Ohio considers joining call for constitutional convention (3/26/2017) Toledo Blade

Has the Flats deflated? Not quite (3/25/2017) Crain’s Cleveland Business

The fight is on to preserve federal funds for the Great Lakes (3/24/2017) USA Today Network

Ten things that happened this week at Ohio Statehouse (3/24/2017) Capital Bureau News

Some Ohio educators question fairness of computer-required testing (3/24/2017) Massillon Independent

2016 Census Data for Northeast Ohio (3/23/2017)

14 of 17 Cleveland City Council Races to be contested (3/22/2017) Cleveland.com

Public forum on state budget cuts highlights local government frustration (3/22/2017) Cleveland.com

EPA cuts would threaten Lake Erie and our drinking water 3/22/2017) Michigan NPR

Cleveland City Council introduces legislation to commit $88M to Quicken Loans Arena improvements (3/21/2017) Cleveland.com

Changes to Ohio concealed carry law take effect today (3/21/2017) Cincinnati Enquirer

Cleveland Metroparks will offer fireworks & music spectacular at Edgewater Park Sat July 22 marking “eve” of 100th anniversary (3/20/2017) Fox 8

Ohio nursing homes among the nation’s lowest rated in quality of care (3/19/2017) Cleveland.com

Income Inequality: Despite thriving economy, many in central Ohio struggle in low-wage jobs (3/19/2017) Columbus Dispatch

Gov. John Kasich among 4 GOP governors who propose Medicaid fix for GOP health care reform (3/17/2017) Cleveland.com

More Cleveland school graduates ready for college but fewer enrolling, according to annual report (3/16/2017) Cleveland.com

Lake Erie programs suffer millions of dollars in losses from Trump budget proposals (3/16/2017) Cleveland.com

Job growth stagnant in Ohio, but many positions still unfilled. Ohio lost about 2,100 jobs last year (3/16/2017) WKBN-TV

Complaints to get Ohio to review amount of testing in schools (3/14/2017) Columbus Dispatch

NE Ohio Retail vacancy rises, but so does the rent. 2016 v 2015 Comparisons (3/13/2017) Crain’s Cleveland Business

Almost all of Ohio’s voucher cash goes to religious schools (3/12/2017) Cleveland.com

Cuyahoga County will back MetroHealth System’s transformation bonds, saving Metro up to $160 million (3/11/2017) Cleveland.com

Greater Cleveland RTA ridership dips to record low; annual ridership, 1976-2016 (3/9/2017) Cleveland.com

Cleveland teachers pass new contract killing most of merit pay plan (3/9/2017) Cleveland.com

Ohio’s proposed transportation budget doesn’t do enough for transit, some lawmakers say (3/8/2017) Cleveland.com

How gerrymandered Ohio congressional districts limit the influence of Ohio voters (3/7/2017) Cleveland.com

Ohio lags in providing need-based grants for college students (3/6/2017) Cleveland.com

Ohio’s payday problem. Critics say the short-term lending industry preys on the poor, but lawmakers aren’t scrambling for a fix (3/4/2017) Crain’s Cleveland Business

Kasich K-12 Budget Means a Loss for Many Districts (3/3/2017) Ideastream

Ohio job growth worst last year since 2009 (3/3/2017) Dayton Daily News

Report: Pittsburgh’s economy ‘prosperous’ but leaving some behind (3/2/2017) Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Congressional redistricting plan would leave Ohio lawmakers in charge (3/1/2017) Cleveland.com

What Privacy Do Students Have? Ohio Supreme Court Hears Backpack Seizure Case (3/1/2017) WOSU

Record number of concealed carry gun permits issued in Ohio in 2016 (3/1/2017) Cleveland.com

Cuyahoga County Council questions financing plan for Quicken Loans Arena renovations (2/28/2017)  Cleveland.com

Ohio reviews since 2011 find 126 non-citizens have voted  Voter fraud is rare, state secretary says (2/27/2017) Associated Press/Cincinnati.com

Pittsburgh’s black middle class has learned to navigate a city that is still segregated in many respects (2/26/2017) Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Cleveland, state, JobsOhio reach deal that clears way for Opportunity Corridor (2/24/2017) Cleveland.com

In One Glenville Neighborhood, Residents See Looming Gentrification (2/24/2017) Ideastream

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson is favorite to win a 4th term – for now: Brent Larkin (2/23/17) Cleveland.com

Seven projects that will change the face of Cleveland (2/23/2017) Freshwater

FirstEnergy talks bankruptcy and need for bailout of its nuclear plants (2/22/2017) Crain’s Cleveland Business

Cleveland to “phase out,” but not close, eight schools after turnaround efforts flounder (2/21/2017) Cleveland.com

Northeast Ohio ranks fourth in Midwest biomedical investments (2/20/2017) Cleveland.com

Who’s running for mayor in Cleveland? Frank Jackson faces a crowded field for re-election (2/20/17) Cleveland.com

Cities reap benefits of downtown bus hubs (2/19/2017) Toledo Blade

Ohio’s tuition vouchers could soon give more money to more middle class, suburban students (2/17/2017) Cleveland.com

Cleveland would lose $2 million under Kasich’s proposal for local aid; 51 other Ohio cities would also lose out (2/16/2017) Cleveland.com

Ohio City park plan, at Irishtown Bend, gets Clean Ohio grant to buy, clear land (2/16/2017) Plain Dealer

Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove reports rough financial year for hospital in 2016 (2/15/2017) Plain Dealer

Who’s running for Cleveland City Council? Here’s a look at potential candidates who have pulled petitions (2/15/2017) Cleveland.com

Opponents, some supporters, of Q renovation plan pack Cuyahoga County Council meeting (2/14/2017) Cleveland.com

News Aggregator “Feature” Archives 2017

News Aggregator “News” Archives 2017

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Important Upcoming Live Events

Important Upcoming Live Events
All open to the public. Please contact if you have questions about any of these events: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net

Tuesday April 18, 2017
“Is the Child Foster Care System in Northeast Ohio Broken?”
Moderated by Phillip Morris, The Plain Dealer

Lakewood Public Library, 15425 Detroit Avenue, Lakewood 44107

6:30-8:00 p.m. Free & Open to the Public

Tuesday May 9, 2017 NEW DATE
“East Side Development: Propects for Reinvention”
Moderated by Terry Schwartz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State Univ.
Cleveland Hts/University Hts Public Library, 2345 Lee Road 44118
7-8:30 p.m. Free & Open to the Public

Tuesday May 16, 2017 
“Fracking and the Impact of the Utica Shale on Ohio”
Moderated by Dan Shingler, Crain’s Cleveland Business
Solon Community Center 35000 Portz Pkwy, Solon, OH 44139
7-8:30 p.m. Free & Open to the Public

Wednesday June 14, 2017
“Transportation in Northeast Ohio. Where’s the equity?”
Moderated by Ginger Christ, Transportation Reporter, Plain Dealer
Urban Community School 4909 Lorain Avenue, Cleveland OH 44102
7-8:30pm Free and Open to the Public

Tuesday August 29, 2017
“The Election for Mayor; a discussion about the future of Cleveland”
Moderated by Leila Atassi, Reporter, Cleveland.com
CWRU Tinkam Veale Student Center, CWRU Campus
11038 Bellflower Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106
7-8:30pm Free and Open to the Public


All open to the public. Please contact if you have questions about any of these events: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net

Most of these are co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer plus Heights, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems and City of Solon. Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.

The Cleveland Catholic series is co-sponsored by John Carroll University-Institute of Catholic Studies, The Carroll News and Teaching Cleveland Digital

 

Editorial: Ohio Constitution deserves bipartisan review Columbus Dispatch 3/23/2107

Reprinted by permission
Original link is here
Editorial: Ohio Constitution deserves bipartisan review
Columbus Dispatch 3/23/2107
Thursday 

State lawmakers should grant a reprieve to the Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission. The 32-member body, diligent but underappreciated, is set to expire prematurely at the end of this year.

The unapologetic executioner is state Rep. Keith Faber, R-Celina, who — as Senate president last session — slipped a poison pill into the state budget to kill the commission.

Now that Faber again is a House freshman, House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and Senate President Larry Obhof have an opportunity to redress Faber’s petulance, show prudence, and allow the commission to fulfill its original promise.

Under the leadership of former Speaker William G. Batchelder, the commission began in October 2011. It was given a decade to work, to expire July 1, 2021.

The Ohio Constitution deserves a periodic, methodical and bipartisan review, which is what has been occurring since the commission got rolling in 2014.

The late start was largely attributable to Faber’s reluctance to help get commissioners appointed and staff hired.

The constitution, 166 years old, is the nation’s sixth oldest. At nearly 57,000 words, it’s the 10th longest. With such age and length comes obsolete provisions and archaic constructions.

Because the state is not likely to hold another state constitutional convention in the foreseeable future (the last was in 1912), a bipartisan commission of respected individuals should be impaneled once every two decades to examine potential amendments for a public vote.

Since 2014, the commission has performed valuable service. It paved the way for two amendments approved by Ohio voters in November 2015, providing for apportionment reform and anti-monopoly safeguards.

Near the end of last year, the commission sent to the General Assembly proposals to eliminate several obsolete sections of the constitution. If sent to the ballot and approved by voters, they would eliminate:

‒ Courts of conciliation, created in 1851 to allow resolution of disputes outside the traditional legal process. They’ve never been used, and long ago were replaced by modern arbitration proceedings.

‒ The Supreme Court Commission, created in 1875 to relieve backlogs of cases. It has not been used since 1885.

‒ Sections authorizing specific debt and bonding authority for projects long ago accomplished with debts long ago paid off.

‒ Provisions on the Sinking Fund Commission, whose responsibilities long ago were taken over by the state treasurer.

Like the legislature itself, the commission works through standing committees, which hear testimony and compile research. The commission’s body of research, available on its website, is a model of objective, detailed analysis — a treasure for researchers and policymakers.

The commission has not yet dived into the constitution’s sections on the executive branch, the elective franchise, the militia, and a few other areas.

One of its committees is attempting to find compromise on an amendment that would make it easier for voters to enact initiated laws, but more difficult to enact initiated amendments.

This is highly sensitive territory, requiring bipartisan diplomacy and outreach to a broad spectrum of interest groups.

Since 1912, the Ohio Constitution has given voters the power to directly initiate constitutional amendments, bypassing the General Assembly. Ohio is one of only 16 states with that provision, and one of only 11 where enactment requires only a simple majority vote.

The committee has discussed requiring a 55 percent vote to amend the constitution. This deserves patient, extensive review. Pulling the plug on the commission sends the opposite message — one of callous indifference.

Teaching Cleveland Welcome Page

Teaching Cleveland Welcome Page

Welcome to Teaching Cleveland Digital phase 2
Here is the original site

old-teaching-cleveland-image

Unfortunately it was an old platform and the time had come to move on
Also unfortunately all of our links from google are lost too. But the search function works pretty well. So just enter the topic you want to find in search and it should should pop up
Thank you for your patience. Click on the photos below if you want more content on the people shown

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johnson-as-the-motorman  carl-stokes-wins-1967

van-sweringens-1927

art-modell-1993

veeck-with-kids-1946

perk-on-fire-1972  voinovich-and-forbes-1986  kucinich-with-forbes

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Teaching Cleveland Stories

Cleveland 1912: Civitas Triumphant By Dr. John Grabowski

Mark Hanna: The Clevelander Who Made a President By Joe Frolik

Rockefeller’s Right-Hand Man: Henry Flagler By Michael D. Roberts

Cleveland’s Original Black Leader: John O. Holly By Mansfield Frazier

The Heart of Amasa Stone By John Vacha

Frederic C. Howe:  Making Cleveland the City Beautiful (Or At Least Trying) by Marian Morton

Bill Veeck: The Man Who Conquered Cleveland and Changed Baseball Forever By Bill Lubinger

When Cleveland Saw Red By John Vacha

Maurice Maschke: The Gentleman Boss of Cleveland by Brent Larkin

Inventor Garrett Morgan, Cleveland’s Fierce Bootstrapper  by Margaret Bernstein

How Cleveland Women Got the Vote and What They Did With It  by Marian Morton

One Man Can Make a Difference by Roldo Bartimole

The Election That Changed Cleveland Forever by Michael D Roberts

Deferring Dreams: Racial and Religious Covenants in Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights and East Cleveland, 1925 to 1970 By Marian Morton

Cyrus Eaton: Khruschev’s Favorite Capitalist By Jay Miller

Ray Shepardson: The Man Who Relit Playhouse Square By John Vacha

Bertha Josephine Blue By Debbi Snook

The Scourge of Corrupt and Inefficient Politician: The Citizens League of Greater Cleveland By Marian Morton

The Man Who Saved Cleveland By Michael Roberts and Margaret Gulley

“Report shows voter fraud is rare” Columbus Dispatch editorial 3/5/2017

Columbus Dispatch editorial:
The link is here
“Report shows voter fraud is rare”

Less than one in a million.

Those are the chances a noncitizen will be found guilty of illegally voting in a statewide election in Ohio. It’s not because authorities aren’t doing all they can to detect and prosecute voter fraud. It’s because votes cast by noncitizens are extremely rare. And, nearly all result from honest mistakes, not fraud.

Once again, Secretary of State Jon Husted has performed a valuable public service by reporting on efforts to identify cases of potential voter fraud and referring them for possible prosecution.

Husted reported that 82 noncitizens voted in 2016. They were among 385 noncitizens improperly registered to vote. Combined with the numbers from the 2012 and 2014 elections, there have been 821 improper registrations and 126 improperly cast ballots. In those three elections, nearly 14.4 million Ohioans went to the polls.

So, for starters, over three statewide elections, a noncitizen cast an improper ballot for every 114,285 voters going to the polls. And, if Husted’s 2016 referrals follow the same pattern as those for 2012 and 2014, prosecutors will find that fewer than 1 in 5 deserve to be charged, and fewer still will be found guilty.

Following the 2012 and 2014 elections, Husted’s efforts resulted in a total of 44 cases of potential fraud being referred. After prosecutors examined the evidence, eight people were charged. Five were convicted. One went to a diversion program. The other two cases were sealed.

Bottom line: Even if all eight of those prosecuted had been convicted, they represent less than one voter in a million. In the 2012 and 2014 elections, nearly 8.8 million Ohioans went to the polls.

Why are noncitizens referred for investigation and possible prosecution so rarely charged? And so rarely found guilty? According to spokesmen for Husted and Attorney General Mike DeWine, prosecutors are much more likely to find honest mistakes than criminal intent. And those honest mistakes are not always the fault of the noncitizen voter; they sometimes are the mistakes of those who register voters and process voting rolls.

Since 1995, federal law — the so-called Motor Voter Law — has required motor vehicle registrars to offer customers the opportunity to register or re-register to vote.

From 2012 through 2016, Ohio’s deputy registrars have registered 896,601 new voters. Given such volume, it’s not rare for a noncitizen — oftentimes with limited English proficiency — to have a voter registration form placed in front of him. And for a mistake to happen.

Prosecutors frequently determine that a noncitizen who registered to vote never intended to register, said DeWine spokesman Dan Tierney. “Sometimes they fill it out truthfully and it still gets through the system,” he said.

Given the rarity of voter fraud in Ohio, some have criticized Husted for devoting so much time and effort to track and report on it.

The Dispatch believes otherwise. The secretary of state is morally and legally obligated to protect the sanctity of the vote. A periodic examination educates the public, puts citizens and noncitizens on notice, and serves as a deterrent.

Voting rights advocates should welcome the vivid illustration of the rarity of voter fraud in Ohio. The plain facts disprove the wearisome claims about rampant voter fraud, made to justify efforts to enact tougher voter ID laws and other restrictions.

Voter fraud is likely at an all-time low in Ohio. That’s something to cheer.

Cleveland History Self Study: A 5 Week Syllabus of Recommended Essays

Cleveland Stories: An Informal Look at the City’s Past

A 5 Week essay-based syllabus suggested by Dr. Marian Morton, professor emerita at John Carroll University with expertise in Cleveland area history.

Overview: A discussion of some of Cleveland’s most interesting and important people, places, and events
Objective: To link the city’s past with its present policies, politics, and practices

Week 1. Introduction. Read Teaching Cleveland Stories (TCS)John J. Grabowski, “Cleveland: Economics, Images, and Expectations”

Week 2. TCS: Mike Roberts and Margaret Gulley, “The Man Who Saved Cleveland.” Elizabeth Sullivan, “Immigration”  John Vacha, “The Heart of Amasa Stone”; Joe Frolik, “Mark Hanna: The Clevelander Who Made a President”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: Timeline of Cleveland/NE Ohio; The Western Reserve, 1796-1820, and Pre-Industrial (Erie and Ohio Canals), 1820-1865 and The Industrial Revolution/ John D. Rockefeller/ Mark Hanna, 1865-1900

Week 3. TCS: John J. Grabowski, “Cleveland 1912 – Civitas Triumphant”; Joe Frolik, “Regional Government versus Home Rule”  John Vacha, “When Cleveland Saw Red”  Margaret Bernstein, ‘’Inventor Garrett Morgan, Cleveland’s Fierce Bootstrapper”  Marian Morton, “How Cleveland Women Got the Vote and What They Did With It”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: Progressive Era/Tom L. Johnson/ Newton D. Baker, 1900-1915 and Fred Kohler/City Managers/Political Bosses, 1920s and The Van Sweringens/ Depression … 1930s

Week 4. TCS: Thomas Suddes, “The Adult Education Tradition in Greater Cleveland”  Bill Lubinger, “Bill Veeck: The Man Who Conquered Cleveland and Changed Baseball Forever”  Jay Miller, “Cyrus Eaton: Khruschev’s Favorite Capitalist” Roldo Bartimole, “One Man Can Make a Difference”  Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 1960s” and “Cleveland in the 1970s”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: World War 2- Post War, 1940s; Carl Stokes- Civil Rights, 1960s and Ralph Perk-Dennis Kucinich, 1970s

Week 5TCS: Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 1980s” and “Cleveland in the 1990s” Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: “10 Greatest Clevelanders”; “12 Most Significant Events”; Cleveland Politician Interview Series (George Forbes, Jim Rokakis, Louis Stokes, George Voinovich, Michael R. White); Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 2000s

General questions: what is the main point of each article? Did you agree or disagree? What did you find most interesting? What would you add? Or subtract? 

 

A brief history of the Ohio income tax by Michael F. Curtin February 15, 2017


 

A brief history of the Ohio income tax
by Michael F. Curtin

Gov. John Kasich keeps swinging his ax at Ohio’s state income tax.

When he launched his 2010 campaign, Kasich revealed a dream of abolishing the tax. He won’t accomplish that, but his fourth and final budget proposal represents his fourth consecutive whack at it.

“We’ll march over time to destroy that income tax that has sucked vitality out of this state,” Kasich declared at his 2010 campaign kickoff.

The nexus between Ohio’s income tax and its economic fortunes is questionable. Forty-three states have income taxes. As of 2014, Ohio’s per-capita income-tax burden ranked 34th, says the conservative Tax Foundation.

In the modern era, conservatives argue the tax punishes initiative and slows economic growth. Progressives defend graduated income taxes as essential for reducing the average Joe’s overall tax burden.

This ideological fault line didn’t always exist. In the early 1900s, as the Progressive Era gained steam, federal and state leaders — Democrats and Republicans — simultaneously took interest in the idea of taxing incomes.

In September 1906, Republican Gov. Andrew L. Harris appointed a five-man tax commission “to investigate the tax laws of this state and to make recommendations for their improvement.”

In June 1909, President William Howard Taft, a Republican, proposed a constitutional amendment giving Congress the power to levy income taxes; the amendment was ratified in 1913.

The work of Ohio’s tax commission prompted delegates to the state’s 1912 constitutional convention to consider a state income tax. The question was put to Ohio voters that September. By a 52-48 vote, Ohioans authorized the General Assembly to consider income taxes, with uniform or graduated rates.

The General Assembly was not quick to use this authority. As the 20th century unfolded, the state looked elsewhere for revenues. In response to needs created by the Great Depression, in 1934 Ohio enacted a statewide sales tax of 3 percent. In 1967, it was raised to 4 percent.

However, pressures for an income-tax increased throughout the 1960s. In 1962, Tax Commissioner Stanley J. Bowers predicted Ohio would need an income tax within five years, primarily to relieve excessive burdens placed on real estate and personal property.

In 1968, a tax-study committee led by state Rep. Albert H. Sealy, R-Dayton, held 24 hearings across the state. Business interests, led by the Ohio Farm Bureau, the Ohio Contractors Association and the Ohio Hardware Association, voiced support for an income tax to offset the hated personal-property tax, which bore no relation to profitability.

In December 1971, after a half-century of buildup, Democratic Gov. John J. Gilligan and a Republican legislature adopted a state income tax, with rates ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 percent. The Republican game plan was to give Gilligan just enough votes to pass the tax, then clobber him with it in 1974.

When conservatives led by state Rep. Robert Netzley qualified a repeal for the November 1972 ballot, Ohio Republican Chairman John Andrews worked behind the scenes in opposition. The Ohio GOP platform that year remained silent on the issue. The repeal failed by more than 2 to 1. There were many reasons for Gilligan’s subsequent defeat, but the GOP tax strategy was pivotal.

The 1981-82 recession prompted Republican Gov. James Rhodes — a master of the “temporary tax” — to win approval of a 50 percent increase in the income tax. His successor, Democrat Richard Celeste, solidified it, adding another 40 percent over pre-1982 levels.

Those increases prompted another repeal effort, this time led by conservative state Sen. Thomas Van Meter. The repeal failed, 56-44.In 1984, for the first time, state income-tax collections surpassed sales-tax collections. By 2005, income-tax revenues accounted for nearly half of all state revenues, far outpacing the sales tax.Since then, the tide has run in the other direction. Under Govs. Bob Taft (1999-2007) and Kasich (2011-present), state income-tax rates have been slashed 30 percent. Sales-tax collections now far outpace income-tax revenues.

Kasich hopes to accelerate that trend, proposing a 17 percent reduction in income taxes, offset by increasing the sales tax to 6.25 percent, from 5.75 percent.

But even with Republican supermajorities in the House and Senate, Kasich might find a shortage of fellow ax wielders. Over time, the income tax comes in handy.

This piece originally ran in the Columbus Dispatch on Wednesday February 15, 2017

Columbus native Michael F. Curtin was formerly a Democratic Representative (2012-2016) from the 17th Ohio House District (west and south sides of Columbus). He had a 38-year journalism career with the Columbus Dispatch, most devoted to coverage of local and state government and politics. Mr. Curtin is author of The Ohio Politics Almanac, first and second editions (KSU Press). Finally, he is a licensed umpire, Ohio High School Athletic Association (baseball and fastpitch softball).