“Voting Rights Forum: What have we learned about how to run elections” a forum on Feb 7, 2019

Thursday Feb 7, 2019 at 7pm
“Voting Rights Forum: What have we learned about how to run elections”
moderated by Rich Exner, Cleveland.com

Panelists:
•Frank LaRose, Ohio Secretary of State
•Michael Li, Senior Counsel for the Brennan Center’s Democracy Program

    
Rich Exner, Cleveland.com, Frank LaRose, Ohio Secretary of State, Michael Li, Brennan Center for Justice

CWRU Beachwood Facility: 25700 Science Park Dr #100, Beachwood 44122
Free and open to the public
Co-sponsored by Cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer, CWRU Siegel Lifelong Learning, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, LWV-Akron Chapter, Bliss Institute for Applied Politics at the University of Akron
Corporate sponsor: First Interstate LTD

The Election’s Over: What did the voters say? a forum on 11/13/18

The video is here:

Tuesday November 13, 2018 at 7pm

5th floor auditorium at InfoCision Stadium Welcome Center
University of Akron, 375 E Exchange St, Akron,  44304
Free and open to the public
A panel of experts will analyze the results of the 2018 midterm elections and what can be expected regarding voting rights and other issues based on the composition of the houses of government.

Moderated by M.L. Schultze, former WKSU news director and reporter,
Dr. John Green, Interim President, University of Akron,
Greg Moore, Former Exec Dir, NAACP National Voter Fund,
Michael Douglas, Editorial Editor, Akron Beacon Journal
Cosponsored by Bliss Institute, University of Akron, Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com, LWV-Akron Area, LWV-Greater Cleveland, Common Cause-Ohio

“Why should I vote? What’s at stake in the November election?” a forum on Thursday Sept 27, 2018

This forum (orig Sept 13 Heights Library) has been rescheduled for: Thursday Sept 27
The new location: Cleveland Heights Community Center
1 Monticello Blvd, Cleveland Hts 44118

The flyer is here
The video is here

Thursday September 27, 2018  7pm
“Why should I vote? What’s at stake in the November election?”
Cleveland Hts. Community Center, 1 Monticello Blvd, Cleve Hts 44118

Panelists
Mike Brickner, Ohio Director, All Voting is Local
Tom Roberts, President, NAACP Ohio Conference
Camille Wimbish, Director, Ohio Voters Rights Coalition

moderated by Harry Boomer, Channel 19

This forum will also offer attendees ways to get involved with non-partisan “Get Out The Vote” efforts led by NOVA and Alpha Omega Foundation.


Harry Boomer

Cosponsored by NAACP-Cleveland Chapter, CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland and Heights Public Libraries

Challenging Gerrymandering, the Purge, and More: A Panel Discussion on Voting Rights  a forum on Oct 4, 2018


The flyer is here
Thursday October 4, 2018 7pm-8:30pm (opens at 6pm)
Challenging Gerrymandering, the Purge, and More:
A Panel Discussion on Voting Rights 
Freda Levenson, Legal Director of the ACLU of Ohio
Jen Miller, Executive Director of the Ohio League of Women Voters
Andre Washington, President of the Ohio A. Philip Randolph Institute
*Moderator, Gary Daniels, Chief Lobbyist for the ACLU
Market Garden Brewery 1947 West 25th St, Cleveland 44113 (lower level)
Light appetizers will be served and there will be a cash bar

Editorial: Fairer districts would be refreshing twist Columbus dispatch 4/30/17

Editorial:
Fairer districts would be refreshing twist

The districts cynically split counties, cities, villages, townships and neighborhoods. The current map splits county boundaries 54 times. Seven counties are split among three or more congressional districts.

The districts twist and turn like snakes and other creatures, none more blatantly than the 9th Congressional District, which slithers along the Lake Erie shore from Toledo to Cleveland.

Central Ohio’s three congressional districts also are geographic absurdities, needlessly dividing neighborhoods, school districts, other governmental units and their concerns. Ohioans deserve congressional districts that respect them and the communities in which they live.

Contorted, meandering districts, in Ohio and other states, are a prime reason congressional politics are poisonous — as partisan and ugly as ever in modern times. They encourage extremism, discourage bipartisanship, and sabotage efforts to find common ground.

Fortunately, Ohioans soon might have an opportunity to support a statewide ballot issue to end gerrymandering in our state.

A coalition of nonprofit organizations, called Fair Congressional Districts for Ohio, has submitted a plan to the Ohio attorney general to place an issue on the statewide ballot in November 2017 or November 2018.

Once the attorney general’s office validates the summary language as fair and truthful, it goes to the Ohio Ballot Board for certification.

The reform coalition then must gather at least 305,591 valid signatures of registered Ohio voters — 10 percent of the number voting in the most recent election for governor.

The plan should win wide acceptance, chiefly because it mirrors the reform plan for state legislative districts overwhelmingly approved by Ohio voters (71.5 percent) in November 2015. It won big in all 88 counties.

The current districts were drawn in 2011 and will stay in place until after the 2020 census. New districts must be drawn in 2021 in time for the 2022 elections.

The proposed plan would take the map-drawing job away from the state legislature and give it to the bipartisan Ohio Redistricting Commission. The commission would be required to draw districts that are compact, do not favor or disfavor any political party, and keep communities together as much as possible.

The League of Women Voters of Ohio, one of the coalition partners, has been working doggedly on this issue for four decades, through Democratic and Republican administrations and legislatures. The league deserves widespread support for its steadfast efforts to add Ohio to the ranks of states putting citizen interests ahead of power politics.

Details of the proposed amendment, and information on getting involved, can be found at fairdistrictsohio.org.

Fortunately, in the past year some of Ohio’s leading Republicans have challenged their party to take a lead role in ending gerrymandering. They include Gov. John Kasich, Secretary of State Jon Husted and former governors Bob Taft and (the late) George Voinovich.

Several years ago, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy — an appointee of Ronald Reagan — said of gerrymandering: “It is unfortunate that when it comes to apportionment, we are in the business of rigging elections.”

Ohioans of every political stripe should embrace this opportunity to slay the gerrymander and end rigged elections.

“Report shows voter fraud is rare” Columbus Dispatch editorial 3/5/2017

Columbus Dispatch editorial:
The link is here
“Report shows voter fraud is rare”

Less than one in a million.

Those are the chances a noncitizen will be found guilty of illegally voting in a statewide election in Ohio. It’s not because authorities aren’t doing all they can to detect and prosecute voter fraud. It’s because votes cast by noncitizens are extremely rare. And, nearly all result from honest mistakes, not fraud.

Once again, Secretary of State Jon Husted has performed a valuable public service by reporting on efforts to identify cases of potential voter fraud and referring them for possible prosecution.

Husted reported that 82 noncitizens voted in 2016. They were among 385 noncitizens improperly registered to vote. Combined with the numbers from the 2012 and 2014 elections, there have been 821 improper registrations and 126 improperly cast ballots. In those three elections, nearly 14.4 million Ohioans went to the polls.

So, for starters, over three statewide elections, a noncitizen cast an improper ballot for every 114,285 voters going to the polls. And, if Husted’s 2016 referrals follow the same pattern as those for 2012 and 2014, prosecutors will find that fewer than 1 in 5 deserve to be charged, and fewer still will be found guilty.

Following the 2012 and 2014 elections, Husted’s efforts resulted in a total of 44 cases of potential fraud being referred. After prosecutors examined the evidence, eight people were charged. Five were convicted. One went to a diversion program. The other two cases were sealed.

Bottom line: Even if all eight of those prosecuted had been convicted, they represent less than one voter in a million. In the 2012 and 2014 elections, nearly 8.8 million Ohioans went to the polls.

Why are noncitizens referred for investigation and possible prosecution so rarely charged? And so rarely found guilty? According to spokesmen for Husted and Attorney General Mike DeWine, prosecutors are much more likely to find honest mistakes than criminal intent. And those honest mistakes are not always the fault of the noncitizen voter; they sometimes are the mistakes of those who register voters and process voting rolls.

Since 1995, federal law — the so-called Motor Voter Law — has required motor vehicle registrars to offer customers the opportunity to register or re-register to vote.

From 2012 through 2016, Ohio’s deputy registrars have registered 896,601 new voters. Given such volume, it’s not rare for a noncitizen — oftentimes with limited English proficiency — to have a voter registration form placed in front of him. And for a mistake to happen.

Prosecutors frequently determine that a noncitizen who registered to vote never intended to register, said DeWine spokesman Dan Tierney. “Sometimes they fill it out truthfully and it still gets through the system,” he said.

Given the rarity of voter fraud in Ohio, some have criticized Husted for devoting so much time and effort to track and report on it.

The Dispatch believes otherwise. The secretary of state is morally and legally obligated to protect the sanctity of the vote. A periodic examination educates the public, puts citizens and noncitizens on notice, and serves as a deterrent.

Voting rights advocates should welcome the vivid illustration of the rarity of voter fraud in Ohio. The plain facts disprove the wearisome claims about rampant voter fraud, made to justify efforts to enact tougher voter ID laws and other restrictions.

Voter fraud is likely at an all-time low in Ohio. That’s something to cheer.

“Gerrymandering 101 and Petition Training” Aug 30, 2017 South Euclid Library

“Gerrymandering 101 and Petition Training”
Aug 30, 2017 South Euclid Library

Event Information:
Congressional Redistricting in Ohio is an overdue and extremely important way to improve our democracy. Find out why and learn how to do something about it at our “Gerrymandering 101 and Petition Training” session at South Euclid-Lyndhurst Branch Library August 30 @ 7pm. Please come and do something positive to make Ohio better

DATE AND TIME
Wednesday, August 30, 2017

7:00 p.m. EDT
South Euclid-Lyndhurst Branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library,
1876 S Green Rd, South Euclid, OH 44121