The Ku Klux Klan in Northeast Ohio: The Crusade of White Supremacy in the 1920s

The Ku Klux Klan in Northeast Ohio: The Crusade of White Supremacy in the 1920s by Steve Anthony Viglio, 2021, Master of Arts in History, Youngstown State University, Department of Humanities.
The link is here

or try this link

The impact of the Ku Klux Klan in the twentieth century has been documented by many historians and scholars, from a national perspective. Local case studies are not quite as common. This thesis looks at two of the most important and popular chapters of the Ohio Ku Klux Klan, Akron and Youngstown. For Akron, I relied on thorough research of the Akron Beacon Journal newspaper archive. For Youngstown, I began research previously conducted by former Youngstown State University faculty Dr. William Jenkins’ Steel Valley Klan and branched from there. I used The Vindicator newspaper as a reliable source for Youngstown Klan history. Specifically, the Akron chapter of the KKK previously has not been researched besides a Master’s thesis several decades ago. Newspaper coverage was abundant in Akron and provided a clear, unbiased blueprint in order to perform the case study. Results of the case studies in Akron and Youngstown show mixed results in terms of the Klan’s effectiveness. In Akron, the Klan was able to infiltrate the Akron public school system for a period. Their ultimate goal of barring Catholic teachers, however, was not achieved. Their popularity peaked by 1925 which was a bit longer than the Youngstown Klan. In Youngstown, they showed moderate success in enforcing bootlegging laws but the 1924 Niles riots signaled the peak for the Klan. Ultimately, from a national viewpoint, the fates of both chapters were very similar. By the end of the 1920s, national Klan popularity had diminished in a similar fashion in Akron and Youngstown respectively.

“Honoring Our Past Masters: The Golden Age of Cleveland Art, 1900–1945’’ WRHS Review by Steven Litt


WRHS: August Biehle, “Study for Great Lakes Exposition Mural,” 1936, watercolor on paper, 20 x30 inches, signed lower right

“Honoring Our Past Masters: The Golden Age of Cleveland Art, 1900–1945’’ WRHS Review by Steven Litt
A new exhibition in the Western Reserve Historical Society’s Cleveland History Center in University Circle, entitled “Honoring Our Past Masters: The Golden Age of Cleveland Art, 1900–1945,’’ argues for greater awareness of and admiration for hometown artists.
December 12, 2021
Read more

Video from “Charles Waddell Chesnutt: The Civic Life of a Cleveland Creative” A talk by Regennia N. Williams, PhD Tues Feb 16, 2021 at 7pm

The video is here:

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2021 AT 7 PM EST
Charles Waddell Chesnutt: The Civic Life of a Cleveland Creative
A talk by Regennia N. Williams, PhD
Zoom RSVP here:
https://cwru.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AUVj1jvvT6Ock1GE0xW9cA

In the life and work of Charles Waddell Chesnutt (June 20, 1858 – November 15, 1932), we find the threads that weave together much of the story of early twentieth-century African American leadership in Cleveland and many of the challenges associated with living life along the ever-present color line.  A celebrated writer and successful business owner, Chesnutt was also known for his activism and reform efforts.  This presentation will consider both his literary life and his work in civic affairs, from the turn of the century through the “New Negro Movement” of the 1920s.

Regennia N. Williams, PhD Distinguished Scholar of African American History and Culture, Cleveland History Center

Cosponsored by Cleveland History Center, League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland and CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning

CLEVELAND’S ENDEARING SYMBOL: 52 STORIES OF THE TERMINAL TOWER

CLEVELAND’S ENDEARING SYMBOL: 52 STORIES OF THE TERMINAL TOWER
The link to the book is here

Curated and designed by Bill Barrow and Donna Stewart, originators of the Cleveland Memory Project at Cleveland State University’s Michael Schwartz Library, the exhibit drew on that library’s Special Collections, but it also featured newly created artworks and video, and material from a remarkable array of community partners, including

  • the Cleveland Museum of Art
  • IdeaStream
  • the Cleveland Museum of Natural History
  • the Cleveland International Film Festival
  • the Rock Hall
  • the Tower City archives, and even
  • the late lamented Cleveland Pickle Company.

No dry, dusty museum piece, the exhibition was an affectionate and informative look at the role of the tower in the life of the city.

Maurice Maschke aggregation

 

1 Maurice Maschke – The Gentleman Boss of Cleveland by Brent Larkin

2 Maurice Maschke from Philip W. Porter

3 Maurice Maschke

4 The Death of Maurice Maschke

5 “Maurice Maschke Memoirs” Plain Dealer Series August, 1934

6 Maurice Maschke, a tribute written by Roelif Loveman, Plain Dealer (11/20/1936)