“Shaker Square: It’s past, present and future” Moderated by Steven Litt, Plain Dealer July 25, 2017

“Shaker Square: Its past, present and future”

Tuesday July 25, 2017 7:00-8:30p.m.
Moderated by Steven Litt, Plain Dealer
Cost: Free & Open to the Public
Shaker Public Library Main Branch, 16500 Van Aken Blvd 44120

Shaker Library Notice     Event flyer here   Forum Preview Here
Summary of forum from Cleveland Scene
Forum Video is here

Panelists:
Brandon E. Chrostowski, Founder, Edwins Leadership & Restaurant Inst.
Peter Rubin, President, The Coral Company
Edward W. Rybka, Chief of Regional Development, City of Cleveland
Captain John Sotomayor, Cleveland Police Fourth District

Positive excitement is building around the possibilities for Shaker Square. This panel will focus on Shaker Square’s past, present and future; retail, housing and security. Join us for an interesting discussion about this significant neighborhood for both Cleveland and Shaker Heights.

 


Steven Litt (photo by Lizzie Litt)

Sponsored by Shaker Heights Public Library and League of Women Voters-Cleveland and Shaker Chapters
For more information, email: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net

“Wildlife in Northeast Ohio: why can’t we all just get along?” forum moderated by Jim McCarty, Plain Dealer July 17, 2017

Wildlife in Northeast Ohio: why can’t we just all get along? 

Monday July 17, 2017 6:30-8:00p.m.
Cost: Free & Open to the Public
Lakewood Public Library, 15425 Detroit Avenue, Lakewood 44107

Event flyer here
Preview story
Video from forum:

Moderator Jim McCarty, Plain Dealer

Panelists:
Jonathon D. Cepek, Wildlife Ecologist, Cleveland Metroparks
Lisa Petit, Chief of Resource Management, Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Harvey B. Webster, Dir of Wildlife Resources, Cleve Museum of Nat Hist

The rising populations of coyote, deer, raccoons, skunks and other animals have made coexistence a challenge in Northeast Ohio. This forum will discuss the current situation and some of the options for managing it


Jim McCarty

Sponsored by Lakewood Public Library and League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland
For more information, email: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net
  

“Home Rule for NE Ohio Communities. Should it be stronger or weaker?” October 17, 2017 @ Lakewood Main Library

“Home Rule for NE Ohio Communities.
Should it be stronger or weaker?”
Tuesday October 17, 2017
moderated by Tom Beres/WKYC-TV emeritus
Lakewood Public Library, 15425 Detroit Avenue, Lakewood, OH
6:30-8:00 p.m. Free & Open to the Public

Flyer here   RSVP here

Panelists include:

Tom Bier, Ph.D, Senior Fellow, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University

Barbara
A. Langhenry, Director of Law, City of Cleveland

Thomas Suddes, Columnist, Cleveland.com/Columbus Dispatch/Dayton Daily News

Michael Summers, Mayor, City of Lakewood
 
This forum will cover the pros and cons of an issue that impacts Northeast Ohio communities almost every day. Who has the right to control laws regarding Gun Control, Fracking, Police, Schools, and many other issues. Should it be local communities? Or should the Ohio legislature set the laws for your city. 

Tom Beres
Cosponsored by Lakewood Public Library, Cleveland.com/Plain Dealer, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning
For more information, please email: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net

Editorial: Fairer districts would be refreshing twist Columbus dispatch 4/30/17

Editorial:
Fairer districts would be refreshing twist

The districts cynically split counties, cities, villages, townships and neighborhoods. The current map splits county boundaries 54 times. Seven counties are split among three or more congressional districts.

The districts twist and turn like snakes and other creatures, none more blatantly than the 9th Congressional District, which slithers along the Lake Erie shore from Toledo to Cleveland.

Central Ohio’s three congressional districts also are geographic absurdities, needlessly dividing neighborhoods, school districts, other governmental units and their concerns. Ohioans deserve congressional districts that respect them and the communities in which they live.

Contorted, meandering districts, in Ohio and other states, are a prime reason congressional politics are poisonous — as partisan and ugly as ever in modern times. They encourage extremism, discourage bipartisanship, and sabotage efforts to find common ground.

Fortunately, Ohioans soon might have an opportunity to support a statewide ballot issue to end gerrymandering in our state.

A coalition of nonprofit organizations, called Fair Congressional Districts for Ohio, has submitted a plan to the Ohio attorney general to place an issue on the statewide ballot in November 2017 or November 2018.

Once the attorney general’s office validates the summary language as fair and truthful, it goes to the Ohio Ballot Board for certification.

The reform coalition then must gather at least 305,591 valid signatures of registered Ohio voters — 10 percent of the number voting in the most recent election for governor.

The plan should win wide acceptance, chiefly because it mirrors the reform plan for state legislative districts overwhelmingly approved by Ohio voters (71.5 percent) in November 2015. It won big in all 88 counties.

The current districts were drawn in 2011 and will stay in place until after the 2020 census. New districts must be drawn in 2021 in time for the 2022 elections.

The proposed plan would take the map-drawing job away from the state legislature and give it to the bipartisan Ohio Redistricting Commission. The commission would be required to draw districts that are compact, do not favor or disfavor any political party, and keep communities together as much as possible.

The League of Women Voters of Ohio, one of the coalition partners, has been working doggedly on this issue for four decades, through Democratic and Republican administrations and legislatures. The league deserves widespread support for its steadfast efforts to add Ohio to the ranks of states putting citizen interests ahead of power politics.

Details of the proposed amendment, and information on getting involved, can be found at fairdistrictsohio.org.

Fortunately, in the past year some of Ohio’s leading Republicans have challenged their party to take a lead role in ending gerrymandering. They include Gov. John Kasich, Secretary of State Jon Husted and former governors Bob Taft and (the late) George Voinovich.

Several years ago, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy — an appointee of Ronald Reagan — said of gerrymandering: “It is unfortunate that when it comes to apportionment, we are in the business of rigging elections.”

Ohioans of every political stripe should embrace this opportunity to slay the gerrymander and end rigged elections.

“Transportation in Northeast Ohio. Where’s the equity?” a forum on Weds June 14, 2017

“Transportation in Northeast Ohio.
Where’s the equity?”

Wednesday June 14, 2017 7:00-8:30p.m.
Cost: Free & Open to the Public
Urban Community School 4909 Lorain Avenue, Cleveland OH 44102

RSVP here   Event flyer here  Preview here

Panelists:
Derek Bauman, Vice Chairman, All Aboard Ohio

Grace Gallucci, Executive Director, NOACA: Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency

Hunter Morrison, Senior Fellow, Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs

Akshai Singh, Member, Clevelanders for Public Transit

Moderator: Ginger Christ, Reporter, Plain Dealer

This panel will discuss the role transportation plays in creating more equitable communities. It will tackle how to offer affordable public transit and design infrastructure to meet the needs of residents throughout the region and examine the funding challenges in doing so.


Ginger Christ

Co-sponsored by the Urban Community School, Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com plus Lakewood, Heights and Cuyahoga County Library Systems

Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd. 
For more information, email: 
teachingcleveland@earthlink.net

“Fracking and the Impact of the Utica Shale on Ohio” a forum on May 16, 2017

“Fracking and the Impact of the Utica Shale on Ohio”
a forum moderated by Dan Shingler, Crain’s Cleveland Business

Tuesday May 16, 2017  
7-8:30 p.m.
Free & Open to the Public
Solon Community Center 35000 Portz Pkwy, Solon, OH 44139

RSVP here  Event flyer here  Preview here
Tape from forum is here


Panelists:
Michael Chadsey, Ohio Oil and Gas Association
Trent Dougherty, Ohio Environmental Council

Edward “Ned” Hill, John Glenn College of Pub Affairs, The OH State Univ.
Moderator:
Dan Shingler, Crain’s Cleveland Business


Dan Shingler

Co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com, Plain Dealer and Cuyahoga County Library Systems
Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.
For more information, email: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net
 

“East Side Development. Prospects for Reinvention” Forum moderated by Terry Schwarz (video)

East Side Development: Prospects for Reinvention
Tuesday May 9, 2017
7-8:30p.m. Cost: Free & Open to the Public
Cleveland Hts/University Hts Public Library, 2345 Lee Road 44118

RSVP here   Event flyer here Preview story

Video from forum is here

Panelists:
Joyce Braverman Director of Development, City of Shaker Hts.
Mansfield Frazier, Journalist, Business Owner and Hough Resident
Wayne Mortensen Director Of Design, Cleveland Neighborhood Progress
Rick Semersky Developer/CEO, VIP Restoration, Inc.

Moderator:
Terry Schwarz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collab., Kent State Univ.

Cleveland’s east side/west side rivalry is a tired cliché—one that’s counterproductive to our ability to move forward as a region. Major investments and new opportunities exist on both sides of the river. But there are some key differences. Some of the most exciting recent developments (Hingetown! Gordon Square! The Lakewood Solstice Steps!) are west of the river. And many of Cleveland’s most distressed neighborhoods lie to the east.

This forum will explore established development strongholds on the east side, as well as emerging neighborhoods. What are the progress indicators and how can we advance development prospects and public space investments in ways that benefit the broader community? Panelists include people directly involved in the hopeful, and sometimes frustrating work of regenerating city neighborhoods and inner-ring suburbs. The forum will highlight current efforts and engage participants in a conversation about local and regional priorities.


Terry Schwarz
Co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Siegal Lifelong Learning Program, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland, Cleveland.com plus Cleveland Hts/University Hts, Lakewood and Cuyahoga County Library Systems
Corporate sponsor: First Interstate Properties, Ltd.
For more information, email: teachingcleveland@earthlink.net