Cleveland History Self Study: A 5 Week Syllabus of Recommended Essays

Cleveland Stories: An Informal Look at the City’s Past

A 5 Week essay-based syllabus suggested by Dr. Marian Morton, professor emerita at John Carroll University with expertise in Cleveland area history.

Overview: A discussion of some of Cleveland’s most interesting and important people, places, and events
Objective: To link the city’s past with its present policies, politics, and practices

Week 1. Introduction. Read Teaching Cleveland Stories (TCS)John J. Grabowski, “Cleveland: Economics, Images, and Expectations”

Week 2. TCS: Mike Roberts and Margaret Gulley, “The Man Who Saved Cleveland.” Elizabeth Sullivan, “Immigration”  John Vacha, “The Heart of Amasa Stone”; Joe Frolik, “Mark Hanna: The Clevelander Who Made a President”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: Timeline of Cleveland/NE Ohio; The Western Reserve, 1796-1820, and Pre-Industrial (Erie and Ohio Canals), 1820-1865 and The Industrial Revolution/ John D. Rockefeller/ Mark Hanna, 1865-1900

Week 3. TCS: John J. Grabowski, “Cleveland 1912 – Civitas Triumphant”; Joe Frolik, “Regional Government versus Home Rule”  John Vacha, “When Cleveland Saw Red”  Margaret Bernstein, ‘’Inventor Garrett Morgan, Cleveland’s Fierce Bootstrapper”  Marian Morton, “How Cleveland Women Got the Vote and What They Did With It”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: Progressive Era/Tom L. Johnson/ Newton D. Baker, 1900-1915 and Fred Kohler/City Managers/Political Bosses, 1920s and The Van Sweringens/ Depression … 1930s

Week 4. TCS: Thomas Suddes, “The Adult Education Tradition in Greater Cleveland”  Bill Lubinger, “Bill Veeck: The Man Who Conquered Cleveland and Changed Baseball Forever”  Jay Miller, “Cyrus Eaton: Khruschev’s Favorite Capitalist” Roldo Bartimole, “One Man Can Make a Difference”  Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 1960s” and “Cleveland in the 1970s”

Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: World War 2- Post War, 1940s; Carl Stokes- Civil Rights, 1960s and Ralph Perk-Dennis Kucinich, 1970s

Week 5TCS: Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 1980s” and “Cleveland in the 1990s” Supplemental: TeachingCleveland.org: “10 Greatest Clevelanders”; “12 Most Significant Events”; Cleveland Politician Interview Series (George Forbes, Jim Rokakis, Louis Stokes, George Voinovich, Michael R. White); Mike Roberts, “Cleveland in the 2000s

General questions: what is the main point of each article? Did you agree or disagree? What did you find most interesting? What would you add? Or subtract? 

 

Video from Deconstructing the Rockefeller Myth — A Cleveland Perspective A talk by Dr. John J. Grabowski Oct 7, 2020 at 7pm

 

Deconstructing the Rockefeller Myth — A Cleveland Perspective
A talk by Dr. John J. Grabowski, Krieger Mueller Associate Professor of Applied History, Case Western Reserve University
Weds October 7 at 7pm via Zoom
John D. Rockefeller, Did He Forget Cleveland? Dr. Grabowski will talk about the various long held beliefs held by many Clevelanders about John D. Rockefeller and whether they are based in truth

Here is the video

This series is cosponsored by Cleveland History Center, CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning and the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland

photo: Ohio Memory

“Bending to the Color Line: The Fight for Women’s Suffrage in Ohio.” a talk by Dr. Carol Lasser July 29, 2020

The video is here:

“Bending to the Color Line: The Fight for Women’s Suffrage in Ohio.”
Wednesday July 29 at 7pm
Dr. Carol Lasser, an emerita professor of history at Oberlin College, will deliver a lecture titled: “Bending to the Color Line: The Fight for Women’s Suffrage in Ohio.”

In the final years of the suffrage struggle, Ohio women’s efforts to gain the vote took place in a national movement that accepted the regional disenfranchisement of African Americans as part of a bargain to overcome Southern resistance. Yet in Ohio, the opposition from organized liquor interests brought Black and white suffragists together. The story of these complex relationships helps us think about how race, region, and special interests shape alliances and access to the vote.
The video is here:

RSVP
https://cwru.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1RL7jdeCTxWTnoCkmJXmFQ
FREE to the public
Made possible with a generous donation from Lin Emmons.

Sponsored by Cleveland History Center, CWRU Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning, League of Women Voters-Greater Cleveland and Rocky River Public Library

Video from “Charles Waddell Chesnutt: The Civic Life of a Cleveland Creative” A talk by Regennia N. Williams, PhD Tues Feb 16, 2021 at 7pm

The video is here:

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2021 AT 7 PM EST
Charles Waddell Chesnutt: The Civic Life of a Cleveland Creative
A talk by Regennia N. Williams, PhD
Zoom RSVP here:
https://cwru.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AUVj1jvvT6Ock1GE0xW9cA

In the life and work of Charles Waddell Chesnutt (June 20, 1858 – November 15, 1932), we find the threads that weave together much of the story of early twentieth-century African American leadership in Cleveland and many of the challenges associated with living life along the ever-present color line.  A celebrated writer and successful business owner, Chesnutt was also known for his activism and reform efforts.  This presentation will consider both his literary life and his work in civic affairs, from the turn of the century through the “New Negro Movement” of the 1920s.

Regennia N. Williams, PhD Distinguished Scholar of African American History and Culture, Cleveland History Center

Cosponsored by Cleveland History Center, League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland and CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning

Video from “Women and Philanthropy: The Monied Women of Cleveland and their Impact” by Dr. Einav Rabinovitch-Fox, Thursday, December 3, 2020

Women and Philanthropy: The Monied Women of Cleveland and their Impact
by Dr. Einav Rabinovitch-Fox, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History, CWRU
Thursday, December 3, 7pm
The talk will examine the role of the Wade family women and their milieu in shaping the culture of philanthropy and the Settlement Movement in late nineteenth century Cleveland.
The video from the talk is here:

Sponsored by Cleveland History Center, Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University, League of Women Voters-Greater ClevelandPhoto: Cleveland History Center of Ellen Howe Abbott Garretson (1836–1922) and her daughter Ellen Garretson Wade (1859–1917)

Video from “Cultural and Political Sources of Cleveland’s Great Cultural and Civic Institutions” w/Prof David Hammack 3.23.2021

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 2021 AT 7 PM EDT
“Cultural and Political Sources of Cleveland’s Great Cultural and Civic Institutions”
On March 23 at 7pm, join David Hammack, CWRU Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History Emeritus, who will speak to this theme:

Why is Greater Cleveland home to so many notable private institutions? The Cleveland Orchestra and the Cleveland Museum of Art both make persuasive claims to be among the very best in the United States. University Hospitals and the Cleveland Clinic give the region two nationally-notable medical systems. The city’s religious and nondenominational social welfare charities have for more than 100 years been national leaders in raising money and developing effective responses to new challenges. University Circle constitutes a university-cultural district surpassed by just a handful of cities in the United States. This lecture will explore the cultural, economic, and political sources of the region’s extraordinary private institutions.
The recording is here:
Cosponsored by CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning, Cleveland History Center and The League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland

The history of the Cleveland Terminal & Valley Railroad Depot (Video)

Sitting on the corner of Canal and Carter Roads in Cleveland, Ohio is a vacant building towered over by modern buildings. It was once a depot for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad built in 1898 and was in service until 1934 when the B&O moved passenger service into the Cleveland Union Terminal. Sherwin Williams purchased the building in 1975 and converted their old paint plant a short distance east of the depot into their Breen Technology Center. There have been multiple attempts to restore the building in the past but none have ever worked out. With Sherwin Williams now planning to move their technology center elsewhere, will the depot be demolished? Or will it hopefully be saved and restored or reutilized for other purposes?

Here’s the link